Removing the chair during a meeting

What can you do when a chair (“presiding officer” or person running the meeting, who is often the president) refuses to follow Robert’s Rules, abuses their power, or acts in an arbitrary manner? Download PDF The first step is to make a Point of Order bringing the error to the chair’s attention. If the chair…

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Getting your board to buy in to Robert’s Rules

A reader writes, “The city council has never used much parliamentary procedure in our meetings. People speak when they want and sidebar discussions are common. How to ease the council into more parliamentary procedure without confusing them?” Download PDF It’s a great question. Here are three steps you can take to get your council or…

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Point of Order and Appeal are heart of democracy

In our view, the motions Point of Order and Appeal are the heart of our democracy. They provide the mechanism to stop a dictatorial chair who is acting like a “boss.” They are essential  for every local government body, nonprofit board, and any group that functions on democratic principles. Learn how to use them to ensure…

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The chair is not in charge of your meeting

It is a little-known fact that ultimately it is the board that is in charge of your meeting, not the chair. According to the principles of parliamentary procedure and Robert’s Rules of Order, the chair runs the meeting while subject to the will of the body as a whole. This is very different from the…

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